Help for refugees and asylum seekers to understand their rights
Choose Language
  • Default
    Reset
  • Afrikaans
    Afrikaans
  • Albanian
    shqip
  • Amharic
    ኣማርኛ
  • Arabic
    عربي
  • Armenian
    Հայերէն
  • Azerbaijani
    آذربايجانجا ديلي
  • Basque
    euskara
  • Bengali
    বাংলা (baɛṅlā)
  • Belarusian
    Беларуская мова
  • Bosnian
    bosanski
  • Bulgarian
    български (bãlgarski)
  • Catalan
    català
  • Cebuano
    Sinugboanon
  • Chichewa
    Chicheŵa
  • Chinese Simplified
    中国简化
  • Chinese Traditional
    中國傳統
  • Corsican
    corsu
  • Croatian
    Hrvatski
  • Czech
    čeština
  • Danish
    dansk
  • Dutch
    Nederlands
  • English
    English
  • Esperanto
    Esperanto
  • Estonian
    eesti keel
  • Filipino
    filipino
  • Finnish
    suomi
  • French
    français
  • Frisian (West)
    Frysk
  • Galician
    Galego
  • Georgian
    ქართული (kʻartʻuli)
  • German
    Deutsch
  • Greek
    ελληνικά
  • Gujarati
    ગુજરાતી
  • Haitian Creole
    Kreyòl ayisyen
  • Hausa
    حَوْس
  • Hawaiian
    ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi
  • Hebrew
    עִבְרִית
  • Hindi
    हिन्दी
  • Hmong
    Hmong
  • Hungarian
    Hungarian magyaChichewar
  • Icelandic
    Íslenska
  • Igbo
    Igbo
  • Indonesian
    Bahasa Indonesia
  • Irish (Gaelic)
    Gaeilge
  • Italian
    italiano
  • Japanese
    日rus本語
  • Javanese
    baṣa Jawa
  • Kannada
    ಕನ್ನಡ
  • Kazakh
    Қазақ тілі
  • Khmer
    ភាសាខ្មែរ
  • Korean
    한국어
  • Kurdish
    Kurmanji
  • Kyrgyz
    قىرعىز
  • Lao
    ພາສາລາວ
  • Latin
    Lingua Latina
  • Latvian
    latviešu valoda
  • Lithuanian
    lietuvių kalba
  • Luxembourgish
    Lëtzebuergesch
  • Macedonian
    македонски
  • Malagasy
    Fiteny Malagasy
  • Malay
    Bahasa melayu
  • Malayalam
    മലയാളം
  • Maltese
    Malti
  • Maori
    te Reo Māori
  • Marathi
    मराठी
  • Mongolian
    Монгол
  • Myanmar (Burmese)
    ဗမာစကား
  • Nepali
    नेपाली
  • Norwegian
    norsk
  • Pashto
    پښتو
  • Persian
    فارسى
  • Polish
    polski
  • Portuguese
    português
  • Punjabi
    ਪੰਜਾਬੀ
  • Romanian
    limba
  • Russian
    Русский язык
  • Samoan
    Gagana Samoa
  • Scots Gaelic
    Gàidhlig
  • Serbian
    српски
  • Sesotho
    seSotho
  • Shona
    chiShona
  • Sindhi
    سنڌي
  • Sinhala
    සිංහල
  • Slovak
    slovenčina
  • Slovenian
    slovenščina
  • Somali
    af Soomaali
  • Spanish
    español
  • Sundanese
    Basa Sunda
  • Swahili
    Kiswahili
  • Swedish
    svenska
  • Tamil
    தமிழ்
  • Tajik
    тоҷики
  • Telugu
    తెలుగు
  • Thai
    ภาษาไทย
  • Turkish
    Türkçe
  • Ukrainian
    Українська
  • Urdu
    اردو
  • Uzbek
    أۇزبېك ﺗﻴﻠی o'zbek tili ўзбек тили
  • Vietnamese
    tiếng việt
  • Yiddish
    ײִדיש
  • Xhosa
    isiXhosa
  • Yoruba
    Yorùbá
  • Zulu
    isiZulu

Glossary

Age assessment

A decision may need to be taken to decide if an asylum seeker is a child or an adult. A young person in this situation is likely to undergo an ‘age assessment’ to carefully consider any available evidence. All accessible sources of relevant information and evidence must be considered, since no single assessment technique is likely to provide a precise estimate of age.

Age disputed child

This usually means someone who says they are a child (under 18 years of age) but the Home Office or Local Authority believes they are an adult (18 years of age or over). Your rights will be different if you are considered to be a child or an adult.

Age of consent

This is the legal age for having sex in the UK. The age of consent is 16 years of age. This law is to protect children from abuse. To help protect younger, the law says that those under 13 years of age can never legally give consent. It is also illegal to take, show or share indecent photographs of a child or for a person in a position of trust (such as a teacher or care worker) to have sex with anyone under the age of 18 who is in the care of their organisation. The Sexual Offences Act 2003 provides more information about the law in relation to sexual activity.

Application Registration Card

Every asylum seeker should be issued with an Application Registration Card (ARC), which is also known as an ARC. This is a credit card sized document which can be used to prove you are who you claim to be. The card contains information about you, including your fingerprint and photograph.

Anti-social behaviour

This covers a broad range of behaviour, ranging from dropping litter to low level crime. It can be very frustrating and hurtful to neighbours. Some of this behaviour is not illegal but it can damage community relationships.

ASF1 Form

This form needs to be completed for asylum seekers to access support from the UK Government. You should apply if you are, or are likely to become, homeless or will run out of money within the next 14 days. You can make a claim at the following website but Migrant Help can also provide you with support completing this form:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/application-for-asylum-support-form-asf1

ASPEN Card

This card is provided by the UK Government to support asylum seekers. The card enables asylum support funds (Section 95 and Section 4 funding) to be provided to asylum seekers without the need for cash payments. The card can be used in shops to buy goods and withdraw funds at a cash machine.

Asylum Rights Programme

A Welsh Government-funded partnership of seven organisations who work with people seeking sanctuary. The Asylum Rights Programme (ARP) provides advice and advocacy. More information about the ARP can be found here:

https://welshrefugeecouncil.org.uk/news/21042017-1405/asylum-rights-programme-arp

 

Asylum Seeker

This is someone who has applied for asylum protection in the UK and is waiting for a decision from the UK Government.

Asylum Support

Asylum seekers who are destitute may be able to receive accommodation or financial support from the Home Office. An application, known as an ASF1 must be submitted to the Home Office to access support. Accepting accommodation support will mean you have no choice in where you are dispersed within the UK.