Help for refugees and asylum seekers to understand their rights
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Wales

Subheading
People seeking sanctuary are welcome in Wales.

This section of the website also explains things you need to know about Wales and the Welsh Government. 

Wales is one of four countries in the United Kingdom. The other countries of the United Kingdom are England, Scotland and Northern Ireland. 

Wales is proud to welcome people from different cultures, faiths and backgrounds and we want them all to call Wales their home. We believe that the mix of different cultures has made Wales even better. We hope you can be part of improving Wales for future generations. 

Wales is a small part of the UK, compared to England. Wales is home to 3.1 million people. Cardiff is our capital city. The national day of Wales is known as St. David’s Day. It is celebrated on 1 March every year. The symbols of Wales are the red dragon, the daffodil and the leek.

Across the whole of the UK, the Pound Sterling (£) is used as the official currency. The head of Queen Elizabeth II is on all notes and coins in circulation.

Wales is divided up into 22 geographical areas known as counties or boroughs. These counties are managed by local authorities (also known as Councils). Councils have many responsibilities, which are explained on the Your Local Area page.

Wales has it's own Government

Wales has its own government called the ‘Welsh Government’. The Welsh Government has responsibility for education, healthcare and transport. They also help people to get along together peacefully in the community. The Welsh Government is also responsible for housing, except asylum accommodation. The government is led by the First Minister of Wales. His name is Mark Drakeford.

The Welsh Government has produced a plan for how we aim to improve things for the refugees and asylum seekers who live in Wales. This plan is called the ‘Nation of Sanctuary’ plan. 

The UK Government has responsibility for some things in Wales. This includes asylum accommodation and deciding who is recognised as a refugee. The UK Government is also in charge of the police, welfare payments, employment rules and immigration laws. The UK Government is led by the Prime Minister. His name is Boris Johnson.

Wales has it's own language

Wales has its own language and culture. The language is called Welsh and it is spoken by about 20% of the population. ‘English’ is the most widely spoken language in Wales.

People from different cultures and nations live in all parts of Wales. Wales has a long history of welcoming migrants from all over the world. Cardiff, Newport, Swansea and Wrexham are home to many refugees and asylum seekers already.

Wales also has a rich history which can be explored online, or at museums and castles across the country.